Living Benches

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jake@designhousestudio.co.uk Composite Theme Submission

rectory-lane-bench-submission
Bench Numbers:
2
Estimated Hours Taken:
N/A
Materials:
Steel gabion, Rubble, Oak wood
Depth:
1000
Height:
450
Width:
5000
Ground Preparation:
The ground has to lay flat, a layer of gravel is ideal but not essential.
Fixings / installation:
The benches is composed by a steel gabion base and topped with multiple oak wood seats. The steel gabion is filled with rubble and soil. The intention is to use the available left over and local stones, flint and bricks to fill up the gabion cage. The oak wood seats are fixed to a steel structure frame and can be removed for periodic seeds planting as well as for maintenance.
Maintenance:
Yearly oil coating, cleaning, light sanding on oak wood parts.

Seasonal seed planting and landscaping.
Cost:
£4650
Other Considerations:
LIVING BENCH design concept is about giving new life to the forgotten park, in opposition to the perception of a cemetery as a dead space. Renovating the cemetery by giving it a new identity is the deriving vision of a seed sprouting from the rocks.

The project will target several types of users, from Berkhamsted residents that will use the park regularly for leisure or workout and residents that will use it occasionally for events; to non-residents that will travel to Berkhamsted to visit the new park few times per year.

To enhance the park and to trigger curiosity, it is necessary that the bench can change and evolve in time. As the park mutates in colours throughout the year, the bench as well will bloom, grow and perish following the course of the seasons.

As many other flower gardens in the UK, from most curated such as Regent’s Park Queen Mary’s Rose Gardens, to the London Fields wildflower meadow, the flora offers a natural evolving spectacle that is ever changing.

Bench 02 is composed by a circular steel gabion base and topped with multiple oak wood seats. The steel gabion is filled with rubble and soil. The intention is to use the available left over and local stones, flint and bricks to fill up the gabion cages. This will keep a consistent look between the surrounding environment filled with existing graveyards and the new benches.